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Special Operations Unit arrests two on charges of heroin, oxycodone trafficking

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Special Operations Unit arrests two on charges of heroin, oxycodone  trafficking

 


SEBRING — The Highlands County Special Operations Unit intercepted two people who were bringing heroin and oxycodone from Fort Lauderdale with the intention of selling them in Highlands County Thursday night (March 2).

 

Acting on a tip, the SOU was waiting when 33-year-old Adam Daniel McKenzie of Sebring — whose license is suspended — drove a red Nissan Frontier into Sebring around 10 p.m. with 28-year-old Quinn Lauren Rogers of Avon Park in the passenger seat. McKenzie was not wearing a seat belt, so they were pulled over in the parking lot of the Beef ‘O Brady’s in Sebring.

 

While speaking with McKenzie, detectives could smell marijuana and could also see what appeared to be (and later tested positive for) marijuana in the driver’s door panel. A further search of the car revealed:

 

  • Two clear sandwich-style bags which contained approximately 14.4 grams of a light brown substance which field tested positive for the presence heroin.
  • Two pink jewelry-style bags containing approximately 0.2 grams of a light brown substance which field tested positive for the presence of heroin.
  • One clear plastic container containing approximately 8.2 grams of a white powder which field tested positive for the presence of oxycodone.
  • One clear bag containing approximately 0.6 grams of a clear, crystallized substance which field tested positive for the presence of methamphetamine.
  • One white, cut straw containing approximately 0.1 grams of a white substance which field tested positive for the presence of cocaine.
  • A brown metal container that contained two clear sandwich-style bags contained approximately 7.2 grams of a marijuana.
  • A gray book bag containing two packages of numerous small jewelry-style bags, a plastic strainer and a coffee bean grinder that contained a white substance which field tested positive for the presence of oxycodone.

 

The combined total weight of the heroin was approximately 14.6 grams, which meets the threshold for trafficking in heroin per Florida statute. Also, the approximate 8.2 grams of oxycodone meets the threshold for trafficking in Oxycodone per Florida statute.

 

McKenzie was booked on charges of trafficking in heroin, trafficking in oxycodone, possession of cocaine, possession of a controlled substance, possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia and use of paraphernalia to transport drugs.

 

Rogers was charged with trafficking in heroin, trafficking in oxycodone, possession of cocaine, possession of a controlled substance, possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana and use of paraphernalia to transport drugs.

 

The investigation revealed that the pair had traveled to Fort Lauderdale to purchase the drugs with the intent to bring them back to Highlands County so they could be sold here.

 

“This was a great job by the Special Operations Unit of quickly acting on information and executing an operation that kept a large amount of very dangerous drugs from making it to the streets of our county,” Sheriff Paul Blackman said. “Any time we can intercept narcotics before they can be sold in Highlands County is a huge win for our agency and the people we serve.”

rogersmckenzie

 

 

FROM THE NETWORK

  • youngcanoli

    Harm reduction is what is needed. We must stop the drug war with objective of shutting down the black market. The drug war has failed. The drug war is driving the problems, not fixing them. Decriminalization/legalization is necessary, it needs to be backed up with public health announcements explaining exactly why it is needed. Its not in any way condoning the abuse of addictors, it is done bc the alternative, the drug war, has made things infinitely worse on almost every level, to include making drugs abundantly available to any & all that wants them.
    We need to pull LE out of the drug biz – that will free up a lot of resources currently chasing their collective tails. When the laws create more harm and cause more damage than they prevent, its time to change the laws. The $1 TRILLION so-called war on drugs is a massive big government failure – on nearly every single level. Its way past time to put the cartels & black market drug dealers out of business. Mass incarceration has failed. We cant even keep drugs out of a contained & controlled environment like prison.
    We need the science of addiction causation to guide prevention, treatment, recovery & public policies. Otherwise, things will inexorably just continue to worsen & no progress will be made. Addiction causation research has continued to show that some people (suffering with addiction) have a “hypo-active endogenous opioid/reward system.” This is the (real) brain disease, making addiction a symptom, not a disease itself. One disease, one pathology. Policy must be made reflecting addiction(s) as the health issue that it is.
    The war on drugs is an apotheosis of the largest & longest war failure in history. It actually exposes our children to more harm & risk and does not protect them whatsoever. In all actuality, the war on drugs is nothing more than an international projection of a domestic psychosis. It is not the “great child protection act,” its actually the complete opposite. Let’s remember, opioids (drug) prohibition is a historical and cultural aberration, just 100 years old. We had fewer drug problems in my own grandparents’ time when opium, morphine, heroin, cocaine and cannabis could all still be bought legally over the counter. (Re)legalizing opioids would not be a “risky social experiment,” as some think. On the contrary, drugs prohibition was the reckless social experiment. And its a massive failure. Alcohol prohibition didn’t work, and opioid prohibition is failing even more miserably. The longer we’ve had drug prohibition laws in place, the worse have the social and health problems they cause gotten.
    The lesson is clear: Drug laws do not stop people from harming themselves, but they do cause addicts to commit crimes and harm others. We need a new approach that decriminalizes the disease. We must protect society from the collateral damage of addiction and stop waging war on ourselves. We need common sense harm reduction approaches desperately. MAT (medication assisted treatment) and HAT (heroin assisted treatment) must be available options. Of course, MJ should not be a sched drug at all. Every human being is precious, worthy of love and belonging, and deserves opportunities to fulfill his or her potential regardless of past trauma, mental and emotional anguish, addictive behaviors or mistakes made.

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